Tuesday, November 19th

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Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelensky, left, meets with U.S. Sens. Chris Murphy, right, and Ron Johnson, center. In a Sept. 5 tweet promoting the visit, the embassy tweeted Johnson and Murphy "underscored strong U.S. support for Ukraine’s sovereignty, territorial integrity, and Euro-Atlantic integration."(Photo: Embassy of the United States of America, Kiev)

GOP Sen. Ron Johnson of Wisconsin sent a letter Monday to House Republicans offering his most detailed account yet of his first-hand involvement in the Ukraine controversy and at the same time assailing the impeachment inquiry against President Trump.  

Johnson said he viewed the inquiry as a "continuation of a concerted, and possibly coordinated effort to sabotage the Trump administration," and he questioned the motives of government witnesses who have voiced concerns about Trump's handling of Ukraine.

Johnson has given his version of events in numerous interviews in recent weeks but provided some new details Monday. 

He talked to National Security Advisor John Bolton before calling Trump when he heard a claim that aid to Ukraine was being withheld until Ukraine launched an investigation.

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Almost 200 Wisconsin National Guard soldiers have returned to the U.S. after serving as guardian angels providing protection in Afghanistan.

Roughly 400 soldiers from Appleton-based 2nd Battalion, 127th Infantry deployed to Afghanistan late last year and about 190 landed at Fort Bliss, Texas, on Sunday.

The rest of the unit remains in Afghanistan. 

The 2nd Battalion, 127th Infantry is the first National Guard battalion to partner with one of the Army's security force assistance brigades. The soldiers were split into small squads to act as protectors for advisers in the 2nd Security Force Assistance Brigade as well as other coalition forces, contractors and Afghan troops. 

The soldiers are now going through demobilization at Fort Bliss and will return to Wisconsin soon. 

The 127th was recently joined in Afghanistan by another 32nd Red Arrow Division battalion — 1st Battalion, 128th Infantry. That unit mobilized in July.

Though Red Arrow Division units have deployed numerous times to Iraq and Kuwait, the 127th was the first to serve in Afghanistan.

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Almost 200 Wisconsin National Guard soldiers have returned to the U.S. after serving as guardian angels providing protection in Afghanistan.

Roughly 400 soldiers from Appleton-based 2nd Battalion, 127th Infantry deployed to Afghanistan late last year and about 190 landed at Fort Bliss, Texas, on Sunday.

The rest of the unit remains in Afghanistan. 

The 2nd Battalion, 127th Infantry is the first National Guard battalion to partner with one of the Army's security force assistance brigades. The soldiers were split into small squads to act as protectors for advisors in the 2nd Security Force Assistance Brigade as well as other coalition forces, contractors and Afghan troops. 

The soldiers are now going through demobilization at Fort Bliss and will return to Wisconsin soon. 

The 127th was recently joined in Afghanistan by another 32nd Red Arrow Division battalion — 1st Battalion, 128th Infantry. That unit mobilized in July.

Though Red Arrow Division units have deployed numerous times to Iraq and Kuwait, the 127th was the first to serve in Afghanistan.

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Voters leave Wards 102-104 at the Sherman Park Boys and Girls Club, Tuesday, April 2, 2019.(Photo: RIck Wood/Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

MADISON - The latest front in Wisconsin's election battle is over who should be on the voter rolls. 

The state last month sent letters to about 234,000 people it believes may have moved. Conservatives sued over the issue last week.

Here's a look at the case and what it could mean for the 2020 presidential election. 

Who sued and why? 

Three men from suburban Milwaukee represented by the conservative Wisconsin Institute for Law & Liberty brought the lawsuit against the Wisconsin Elections Commission. They argue state law requires election officials to remove people from the voter rolls if they haven't heard from them within 30 days of notifying them they believe they have moved. 

Election officials contend the 30-day requirement does not apply, in part because the state has not determined that it has reliable information about who has moved.

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U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson said Sunday that sources of the whistleblower "exposed things that didn't need to be exposed."

The Wisconsin Republican told "Meet the Press" host Chuck Todd that the impeachment process has weakened executive privilege, which allows the president to withhold information. 

"The weakening of executive privilege is not good,” Johnson said.  "It's going to be very difficult for future presidents to have a candid conversation with a world leader cause now we have set a precedent of leaking transcripts.

"Having this all come out into public .... has exposed things that didn't need to be exposed. This would have been far better off if we were just taking care of this behind the scenes." 

Johnson's comments come days after public hearings on the impeachment inquiry began.

The inquiry is investigating whether President Donald Trump improperly withheld foreign aid to Ukraine in exchange for an investigation into former Vice President and Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden.